Sep 16, 2009

Assessment Rain Check

Sadly my meeting today with Dr. Fordyce did not happen. It turns out we're both extremely busy people. Being the head of the Otago University's Geology department means Dr. Fordyce carries an awful lot of responsibilities and commitments, and myself being a teacher work the same hours as his. So when I got an offer for a morning of work, I couldn't turn it down, but sadly Dr. Fordyce was occupied all afternoon when I could pop into see him.

This has me bummed out, as I was really jazzed about getting the whale into its final production stage (I need a lot more technical input on whales, as they are pretty new to me reconstruction wise). Oh well, I have this demo of my whale, with all the necessary angles for Dr. Fordyce to tear apart (I'm anticipating a need to shrink all the teeth based on my research of Dolphins this morning, and there is bound to be more mistakes in the skull...).

Oh well. I am hoping to regroup and catch him after work tomorrow or Friday, and that failing I have no scheduled work next week (on account of it being the last week of skool this term).

I am also very saddened that no one has taken (even a half) guess at what type of whale this is :(

Your next hint, to help promote some participation, it is found in New Zealand (and thus has appeared on Traumador at least once ;p ). Good luck...

7 comments:

Glendon Mellow said...

I'm gonna go with Squalodon, possibly one of the earliest with echolocation.

This is my guess because a) it looks like it, snd b)I notice on the Wikipedia page a citation to Fordyce, presumably your collegue.

Raptor Lewis said...

Sorry, to hear that you couldn't meet Dr. Fordyce! :( I wish you better luck next time! ;)

Oh well! At least your whale is looking good. ;)

Weapon of Mass Imagination said...

Glendon- Nicely done sir, and here I was thinking I was covered by a few possible choices (Fordyce has described a lot of whales in his time), but I am undone oh so easily.

You are correct, it is indeed Squalodon (though the exact species is unclear to me... I'm not sure he has formally described it yet actually).

Have to let you know how he likes the model (hopefully tomorrow...)

Glendon Mellow said...

Woo-hoo! Do I win a free trip to New Zealand? Excellent, I'll go and pack.

It really does look like the other reconstructions I saw, but with much more interesting colouration.

Raptor Lewis said...

Well...thanks to Glendon, I just learned something today! :)

Dinorider d'Andoandor said...

Like the way it opens its jaws, seeing the picture you posted on your previous entry I just say that you could certainly twist it into any of the giant penguins of the ancient southern hemisphere seas.

Lindsay said...

Love your blog and projects - as does my son. Here is my silly question: my son is 8 and a 'paleantologist' since about 4. He wants to be a pterasaur for halloween and in his words, the costumes out there are all so FAKE! So i need to create a 'real' looking one. Any ideas on creating a moveable wingspan and bony head for the kid? He's leaning toward pteronadon...
Thanks!!